Miranda. 23. Filipina-Australian, cisgender, and bisexual lady-type. Useless wastrel who daydreams in sequins, comic book expressions and musical numbers.

You might know me from that one glasses meme.

Prone to posting intersectional feminist quotes, various and varying babes, items of the literary and comic nerd culture and the occasional tentacle.

Any reaction images/gifs I post (unless they are of my face) are almost definitely not mine.

kammartinez:

Author John Scalzi was on a roll this morning (currently 7:14 AM, 26 Sept. 2014) with a tweet he found from some guy sending out an “ultimatum” to women to “make a choice” between feminism and, well, men like him. So Scalzi launched into a truly magnificent set of scorchers, which I’m posting here for the delectation of people everywhere.

Also: I would like to thank that guy for setting the ultimatum. It makes finding a boyfriend so much easier when the undesirable ones wear a placard identifying themselves.

yall:

THE REASON WOMEN DIDNT PAY FOR THEIR MEALS WAS BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO HAVE BANK ACCOUNTS AND WHEN WOMEN EARN THE SAME AS MEN THIS FORM OF “CHIVALRY” WILL MOST LIKELY END AS MANY COUPLES ALREADY SPLIT THE BILL OKAY CAN PEOPLE STOP USING THIS IN A DISCUSSION OF EQUALITY AND IM SORRY FOR CAPS LOCKS I WANTED TO STOP BUT IT WAS TOO LATE

On portraying strong women on the screen: It’s kind of refreshing as a woman not to be playing a character that’s just defined by whom she’s in love with, to be honest. With Margaery, political ambition is motivating her—her relationships with all these different men has an agenda. Game of Thrones is like The Hunger Games in so far as it has beautiful writing of strong, complex, contradictory women—whether you’re talking about Arya Stark or Brienne of Tarth, who are physically empowering themselves; or women like Cersei and Margaery, who are doing the more traditional political court machinations. Margaery represents a very modern sort of PR, winning the hearts and minds. I’ve called her Kate Middleton crossed with your First Lady, Michelle Obama. She is a politically savvy woman who is harnessing romantic notions of royals in the populous’ mind.

(Source: nataliedormersource)

pag-asaharibon:

not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the PhilippinesThe Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:
Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. 
Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipina, the first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.
Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US
Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.
Articles 
Filipinas who were first in PH history
I Am… Woman: Historic Filipinas
#SexTalk: Who is the Filipina of today?
Sampaguita Girl: The Pinay Activist Timeline
Women play key role in PH peace process
VIDEO: Where does the Filipino woman stand today?
Of race and gender clashes: Do women rise above labels?
'Breaking the Silence': The truth about abortion
Defending Filipino women from stereotypes
Importing, exporting stereotypes: How do global Pinays cope?
Barbara Jane Reyes: Virtual Blog Tour, Is Pinay Lit a Genre, and Tagging Others
Books
Denise Cruz’s Transpacific Femininities: The Making of the Modern Filipina
Mina Roces’ Women’s Movements and the Filipina 1986-2008
Melinda L. de Jesús’ Pinay Power: Peminist Critical Theory (reprinted this year)
chidtalk’s recommendations
A systems approach to improving maternal health in the Philippines by Dale Huntington, Eduardo Banzon, and Zenaida Dy Recidoro
Does Feminism Have to Address Race? by Latoya Peterson
Early Feminism in the Philippines by Athena Lydia Casambre and Steven Rood
Feminism and race in the Philippines
Feminism and the present image of Filipino women
Filipiniana: Philippine Women’s Studies
News From the Tropics: Is there Feminism in the Philippines?
Philippines: Feminists Converse on Social Movement Building
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Cicely Richard
The changing role of women in Philippine society by G. Fitzsimmon
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Zakiya Mahomed
Tumblr posts
chidtalk’s post on Filipin@s and Feminism
pinoy-culture’s 10 Kickass Pilipina Warriors in History That You Probably Never Heard Of

pag-asaharibon:

not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the Philippines

The Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:

  • Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo
  • Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
  • Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipinathe first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
  • Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.

Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US

Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.

Articles 

Books

chidtalk’s recommendations

Tumblr posts

dallisons:

right but more talk about educating women like shailene woodley who don’t really understand the concept of feminism and thus consider feminism with a very naive type of internalized misogyny and less trash talking women who were brought up within the patriarchy and haven’t learned what they need to yet

because like, 99% of us? were there

and then we got out

some people are still getting out

(Source: thenemeton)

fandomsandfeminism:

benny-cum-in-my-ass:

fandomsandfeminism:

doctor-no-boyfriend:

Feminism had a noble cause for equality until it became a hate movement .

People have been accusing feminism of being a hate movement since women started trying to get the right to vote. 

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but that was before tumblr got to it and now people are scared to be white, cis gendered and straight

If people are “Scared” to be white, cis, and straight people marginalized people on the internet might call them out for the oppressive shit they are complicit in unapologetically, then maybe that’s a good damn learning experience. 

Because here is the thing about privilege- it often becomes VERY hard to separate “I am part of a privileged demographic” and “I have unintentionally contributed to other people’s oppression because I’m part of a privileged demographic and these behaviors have been normalized for me.” So being called out feels like a personal attack.

That doesn’t make feminism or other social equality movements “hate movements” 

It means that the sensibilities of oppressors is not more important that social activism to end systematic inequality. 

Men in the 1910’s said that they felt ATTACKED by the Suffrage movement. That they were being unfair targeted for being men by these women.

And that was no more true in 1910 than it is now. The more things change, the more they stay the same. 

In my ideal world, the misogynists would be ultra-detectable, with facial pocks and sulfury odors and grunt “wiggle your glazed donut ass for me.” I would even take the world as I thought it a few years ago, where misogynists talk like Tucker Max and live in Greek houses and call women “biddies.” But confusingly, misogynists are sometimes men who speak softly and eat vegan and say “a woman’s sexual freedom is an essential component to her liberation. So come here.” It’s a tricky world out there. And while I’d prefer a critical approach to gender from men I elect, read, and even bed, in my experience, the so-called feminist men I’ve met deep down have not been less antagonistic or bigoted toward women. What I see over and over again is misogyny in sheep’s clothing, and at this point, I would rather see wolves as wolves.

-

The Fake Male Feminist Chicanery by Minh Nguyen | Cold Drank

(Read the whole essay. I just got my life this Tuesday.)

(Source: dc-via-chicago)

peppersongg:

if you don’t want to call yourself a feminist because of the historical failure of feminism to be sufficiently intersectional, feminists should be respectful of that while we try to fix our movement. People have every reason to reject feminism on grounds of racism, transmisogyny, ableism and various other problems. The only reason you can get mad about people rejecting feminism is if it is out of ignorance to misogyny embedded in social structures and government.

(Source: creppysong)

sarahreesbrennan:

gratuitous-moonspeak:

getting sick of female YA authors crying about every little bit of criticism they get. “oh boo hoo I’m a girl and I’m getting criticized so it must be sexist”

like hey yeah maybe you’re just bad at writing? maybe you need to break out of your circle jerk of well-to-do writer friends who just pat each other on the back and say, “no no it’s fine if people don’t like your writing it’s not because you’re a hack, it’s because they’re a meanie poo poo head”? maybe you need to get people who aren’t emotionally invested in you to read your shitty stories and give you actual feedback so you can improve as an author?

but what am I saying, I’m not a NY Times best-selling author

This was tagged ‘Sarah Rees Brennan’ and ‘whiny babies’, so I presume it refers to me and the recent post I made.

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Now, I’m going to have to ask for my readers for a little help here. I promised myself that this once, I would react to this stuff, and show it to people so everybody knows about the things women writers usually keep quiet about. But I don’t want to set people on anybody. I don’t want anyone else called names, and I definitely don’t want anyone to become a target for defending me. So… please, please don’t message this person. Trust me. I can take care of myself, and I’m trying to do so. Thank you in advance, my crystal vases of clear water: I appreciate you. 

So here we go. Original poster, I am sorry that female YA writers talking about sexism bores you, because I fear we are not going to stop.

http://jenniferlynnbarnes.tumblr.com/post/51744321696/for-those-of-you-interested-in-publishing-some

http://jenniferlynnbarnes.tumblr.com/post/52139503163/author-gender-null-results-examining-privilege

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/maureen-johnson/gender-coverup_b_3231484.html

More bad news: sometimes adult-fiction female authors discuss it as well!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jason-pinter/jodi-picoult-jennifer-weiner-franzen_b_693143.html

There are a few misapprehensions in this post.

1) Misapprehension 1—I was talking about book criticism.

On amazon and goodreads and tumblr there’s plenty of criticism of every book in the world, including my books. That’s excellent. I would fight to the death for anyone’s right to leave a review on my book that said ‘Total poop.’ (I vow not to go looking for the inevitable goodreads review that says ‘Total poop’ after this post.) I’m not going to say I don’t care—but I respect anyone’s right to criticise the quality of my books. It’s subjective. It’s their opinion, and they get to express it.

My post was not about book criticism.

I was pointing out that women get judged for their hobbies in a way men don’t get judged for theirs.

I was pointing out that a man can do the exact same thing as a woman, and yet nobody criticises the guy for it.

Having your school visits cancelled because of malicious strangers, getting death threats, being publicly insulted at book signings, being threatened with—as another author who reblogged this was—acid in the face… none of that is book criticism.

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2) Misapprehension 2. I am a NY Times best-selling author and very well-off…?

Okay, the NY Times bestseller thing is a technicality. Technically I am one. But it’s for stories I co-wrote, and it’s because those stories are about a super-popular character I did not create. I think it’s wonderful he’s so popular, I think it’s a testament to the fact readers will embrace diverse characters, I’m proud to be a part of the project, but I can’t take the credit. And it sure doesn’t make my books bestselling. I worry every day that I won’t ever get another book published. (Um… clearly if I didn’t, it would be good news to some.)

As for being ‘well-to-do’: well, yes again, in a way. I can live and pay rent on the money I make, and have luxuries like travel and lots of books, and without being subsidised by another job, or a parent or a spouse. (My parents would fire me out of a cannon if I asked, and nobody has as yet been convinced to take me on in holy matrimony, so it’d have to be another job.) Someone on twitter did the maths and described my yearly income as pretty average and that’s about right (for a privileged person in a privileged position, which I am). I’m super lucky to be able to support myself, for the moment, on my earnings as a writer. But I don’t have that many expenses—I don’t own a house, I don’t have kids—that’s how I make my life work. I certainly can’t afford an assistant to weed out all the hatemail I get, or to go through my tumblr tag for me so I don’t have to see hate there. I want to be clear that I’m very lucky, but also make clear that I don’t know why anyone would decide I was wealthy enough for it to be commented on.

I’m also… not sure why I decided to announce to people who don’t like me that I’m not rich and popular.

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I’d be delighted to be rich and popular! I don’t mind if people who dislike me spend their time going ‘That SRB… her life is so great’ even though I’m actually spending my time catching up on My Mad Fat Diary and I haven’t brushed my hair since yesterday.

What I’m thinking is that I want to make the same point as in my first post. The point is twofold.

a) The assumptions people make (often about women) often aren’t true.

b) Said assumptions are often hurled as accusations against women, and that’s unfair whether they’re true or not.

Jennifer Lynn Barnes, in her amazing follow-up post to mine, discussed parasocial relationships and the way people come to believe they know other people whom they do not know. 

http://jenniferlynnbarnes.tumblr.com/post/77959090266/on-fandom-parasocial-relationships-and-what-we-dont

So I share all this personal information to show… well, clearly this person doesn’t know me. None of us know the people we only know from the internet.

But to the second point—if I was well-off or bestselling, would it be okay to call me names? I think I was called ‘well-to-do’ and ‘bestselling’ to highlight this person’s belief I don’t deserve success.

Women in many fields are told that they are not deserving of success, money or recognition. It’s kind of a thing.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/13/130519-women-scientists-overlooked-dna-history-science/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/monkey-cage/wp/2013/10/04/why-is-work-by-women-systematically-devalued/

And we tell ourselves we suck, too. 

http://www.psmag.com/navigation/business-economics/qualified-job-wait-probably-imposter-syndrome-psychology-68700/

(Er. Oh dear. Talking about sexism again! Funny that.)

3) Misapprehension 3… I don’t have anyone to critique my work who is not emotionally invested in me.

… But of course I do?

They’re called my editor and my copyeditor. That’s their job. 

Extra critique is an optional extra, something I ask for from some people whose professional expertise I trust, as an add-on to the publisher’s feedback I already get, because I really want my books to be as good as they can possibly be. Some of these critique partners are very well-off, some of them a lot worse-off than me. Some of them are emotionally invested in me (that’s how things work with your friends) some of them couldn’t care less about me but do it because I will critique for them in return, or because I pay them. I wouldn’t keep them as my critique partners unless they critiqued me thoroughly.

All my critique partners do critique me extremely thoroughly, and none of them have ever told me that other critiques were mean. ‘Go meaner’ they murmur to themselves as I writhe on the floor, then pick myself back up again and write. ‘MEANER.’ 

If there is a strong objection to writers being friends, please go back in time and make a complaint to Shelley, Byron, and Keats, the original mean girls clique. Also to C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and J.A.W. Bennett—a bunch of people who loved initials. Thank goodness nobody ever liked something they wrote.

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(Some bunch of losers.)

Wait no, they’re men, and people don’t critique men for being friends or colleagues, even though dudes being colleagues means way more benefits for dudes than for ladies:

http://www.ibtimes.com/book-reviews-are-boys-club-vida-count-finds-women-still-rare-sight-pages-major-literary-magazines

(There I go talking about sexism again! Sorry, sorry, it’s a sickness. It’s not like it comes up all the time.)

4) Misapprehension 4… I don’t care for being called ‘whiny’ as it’s a pretty gendered term.

http://bigthink.com/harpys-review/hop-on-the-waaaambulance-in-defense-of-whining-women

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(I don’t know what it is with this compulsion of mine to say that things are sexist… when I think they’re sexist. It’s so weird.)

As for being called a ‘hack’… that was actually a perfectly fine thing to say. This person doesn’t know me. I can tell them that I love my work, and that I work very hard, and that I try to produce stories that feel original and exciting to me, but they don’t have to believe me.

If the ‘shitty stories’ (thanks for reading my work, original poster, and I’m sorry it wasn’t your cup of tea) I write struck them as ‘hastily written (they weren’t), routine or commercial (I wish!)’—I looked up hack, it’s in the definition—that’s fair. It’s a judgement of my writing and that’s fine. 

It is, however, a judgement more often made about women than men.

We’ve all heard that women can’t write. People come to books thinking ‘oh lord, a girl’ or ‘I can’t stand her’ and it’s very hard to read a book you’re prejudiced against fairly: it’s very easy to decide women are lousy writers.

http://www.salon.com/2011/06/02/naipaul_slams_jane_austen_women_writers/

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If you’ve called men hacks too, just as often, then fine. If you’ve given the matter serious thought and gone: yes, even if this person was someone I really liked I’d think the writing sucked, fine. Call me a hack. You have my permission, and you didn’t need my permission in the first place.

Here’s a thought to close with, about insults that aren’t about writing. You can call me a hack if you like, but there are other words (which the original poster didn’t use) which I do find unacceptable. 

I get called a bitch a lot. It’s not a word I like.

http://the-toast.net/2013/11/12/a-female-author-talks-about-sexism-and-self-promotion/

If someone honestly spends their time going ‘God, when will these stupid whiny bitches stop talking about feminism? Sexism exists, but this bitch isn’t suffering from it! What a bitch, why doesn’t she shut her stupid bitch mouth!’ and they don’t see a contradiction there, okay. I don’t get it, but it happens a lot. It’s happened to me a lot. 

But here’s a suggestion: a good way to make me stop talking about being called a bitch would be to stop calling me a bitch. And I’d enjoy being called a bitch less often. Everybody wins!

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Guess what? I’m sick of talking about this too. It would be better for me if I just shut up. It’s scary for a writer who’s (as extensively discussed) not that popular, and terrified about her career. It’s scary for a woman who is concerned about her physical safety. I don’t want people calling me a bitch or a whiny baby (and as you can see, they do). I don’t want people making fun of a picture of me up on Oh No They Didn’t. I don’t want people picking apart my books because they’ve decided they dislike me. I don’t want people telling me that I’m imagining negativity when negativity comes at me every day.

I’d like a world which doesn’t punish women for talking about their own damn lives, though. I want the world to be different. I think it’s important to talk about this.

So I will.

daniellemertina:

date a girl who reads bell hooks and other on point feminist theorists because she will recognize that there are multiple ways to be objectified including by the ‘date a girl who reads’ trope.