About

Miranda. 23. Useless wastrel who daydreams in sequins, comic book expressions and musical numbers.

You might know me from that one glasses meme.

Prone to posting feminist quotes, various and varying babes, items of the literary and comic nerd culture and the more than occasional tentacle.

Any reaction images/gifs I post (unless they are of my face) are almost definitely not mine.

Cheshire - Created by Alter Imaging
1 year ago | 6,836 notes

The cast for Radio 4’s adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere

neil-gaiman:

thenotoriousscuttlecliff:

James McAvoy

Benedict Cumberbatch

Romola Garai

Sophie Okonedo

Andrew Scott

Anthony Head

Bernard Cribbins

Maureen Lipman

And

Sir Christopher Lee

Is this the best cast ever or what? 

And many more…

asdfghgfsadhsa YES

Via Stupid Shit
1 year ago | 45,843 notes

My cousin Helen, who is in her 90s now, was in the Warsaw ghetto during World War II. She and a bunch of the girls in the ghetto had to do sewing each day. And if you were found with a book, it was an automatic death penalty. She had gotten hold of a copy of ‘Gone With the Wind’, and she would take three or four hours out of her sleeping time each night to read. And then, during the hour or so when they were sewing the next day, she would tell them all the story. These girls were risking certain death for a story. And when she told me that story herself, it actually made what I do feel more important. Because giving people stories is not a luxury. It’s actually one of the things that you live and die for.

- Neil Gaiman  (via rookiemag)

(Source: lupanthropy)

Via
1 year ago | 12,669 notes
neil-gaiman:

kylecassidy:

Spent the weekend at Castle Gaiman relaxing gloriously and working on a Top Sekret art project. This is not the Top Sekret art project; this is Neil on a trampoline.
As promised.
Use it wisely.

I did not know I was being sneakily filmed. It was early in the morning and I was trying to wake myself up….

neil-gaiman:

kylecassidy:

Spent the weekend at Castle Gaiman relaxing gloriously and working on a Top Sekret art project. This is not the Top Sekret art project; this is Neil on a trampoline.

As promised.

Use it wisely.

I did not know I was being sneakily filmed. It was early in the morning and I was trying to wake myself up….

Via Neil Gaiman
1 year ago | 23 notes

timelordavenger:

Did I mention Sir Terry Pratchett is the other writing half of Good Omens?

Because you all are obsessed with that book and Neil Gaiman so I literally cannot understand why you haven’t read Discworld.

Seriously. I’m baffled.

Oh man, all of this.

I love Neil Gaiman and his writings to death, but Discworld makes me happy all the damn time.

Via We were all buried at sea
1 year ago | 431 notes
rosalarian:

kateordie:

November 2013 - J H Williams III + Neil Gaiman =




it’s going to be so beautiful oh my goodness

rosalarian:

kateordie:

November 2013 - J H Williams III + Neil Gaiman =

it’s going to be so beautiful oh my goodness

Via megan rosalarian gedris
1 year ago | 4,594 notes

neil-gaiman:

Psst. News.

(It has been hard to keep this a secret for the last 18 months… But somehow we did.)

AAAAHHhHhH and it’s JH FUCKING WILLIAMS and SANDMAN ahhhhhhhhhhh

Via Neil Gaiman
1 year ago | 2,798 notes
humanmindinformaldehyde:

- Neil Gaiman

I kinda want this comic framed on my wall.

humanmindinformaldehyde:

- Neil Gaiman

I kinda want this comic framed on my wall.

(Source: ocular-splendor)

Via Neil Gaiman
2 years ago | 846 notes

neil-gaiman:

A short, silent film I wrote and directed a couple of years ago, starring Bill Nighy and that girl from “The Dresden Dolls”. 

I wonder whatever happened to her?

Music by Sxip Shirey.

Oh, that’s really lovely.

Via Neil Gaiman
2 years ago | 1,944 notes
neil-gaiman:

From the BUST Blog. Made by Bill Stiteler, who also directed and made my SFX acceptance speech video…
Photo by the amazing http://www.aliyanaumoff.com/
Something to amuse people until I return.

asdasdfag YES.

neil-gaiman:

From the BUST Blog. Made by Bill Stiteler, who also directed and made my SFX acceptance speech video…

Photo by the amazing http://www.aliyanaumoff.com/

Something to amuse people until I return.

asdasdfag YES.

Via Neil Gaiman
2 years ago | 16,741 notes

When the web started, I used to get really grumpy with people because they put my poems up. They put my stories up. They put my stuff up on the web. I had this belief, which was completely erroneous, that if people put your stuff up on the web and you didn’t tell them to take it down, you would lose your copyright, which actually, is simply not true.

And I also got very grumpy because I felt like they were pirating my stuff, that it was bad. And then I started to notice that two things seemed much more significant. One of which was… places where I was being pirated, particularly Russia where people were translating my stuff into Russian and spreading around into the world, I was selling more and more books. People were discovering me through being pirated. Then they were going out and buying the real books, and when a new book would come out in Russia, it would sell more and more copies. I thought this was fascinating, and I tried a few experiments. Some of them are quite hard, you know, persuading my publisher for example to take one of my books and put it out for free. We took “American Gods,” a book that was still selling and selling very well, and for a month they put it up completely free on their website. You could read it and you could download it. What happened was sales of my books, through independent bookstores, because that’s all we were measuring it through, went up the following month three hundred percent

I started to realize that actually, you’re not losing books. You’re not losing sales by having stuff out there. When I give a big talk now on these kinds of subjects and people say, “Well, what about the sales that I’m losing through having stuff copied, through having stuff floating out there?” I started asking audiences to just raise their hands for one question. Which is, I’d say, “Okay, do you have a favorite author?” They’d say, “Yes.” and I’d say, “Good. What I want is for everybody who discovered their favorite author by being lent a book, put up your hands.” And then, “Anybody who discovered your favorite author by walking into a bookstore and buying a book raise your hands.” And it’s probably about five, ten percent of the people who actually discovered an author who’s their favorite author, who is the person who they buy everything of. They buy the hardbacks and they treasure the fact that they got this author. Very few of them bought the book. They were lent it. They were given it. They did not pay for it, and that’s how they found their favorite author. And I thought, “You know, that’s really all this is. It’s people lending books. And you can’t look on that as a loss of sale. It’s not a lost sale, nobody who would have bought your book is not buying it because they can find it for free.”

What you’re actually doing is advertising. You’re reaching more people, you’re raising awareness. Understanding that gave me a whole new idea of the shape of copyright and of what the web was doing. Because the biggest thing the web is doing is allowing people to hear things. Allowing people to read things. Allowing people to see things that they would never have otherwise seen. And I think, basically, that’s an incredibly good thing.

- Neil Gaiman on Copyright, Piracy, and the Commercial Value of the Web (X)

(Source: roominthecastle)

Via If You'll Pardon the Engineering Parlance