About

Miranda. 23. Useless wastrel who daydreams in sequins, comic book expressions and musical numbers.

You might know me from that one glasses meme.

Prone to posting feminist quotes, various and varying babes, items of the literary and comic nerd culture and the more than occasional tentacle.

Any reaction images/gifs I post (unless they are of my face) are almost definitely not mine.

Cheshire - Created by Alter Imaging
23 hours ago | 42,254 notes

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.

Via Bigger on the Inside
3 weeks ago | 169 notes
womensweardaily:

"There is this idea that elegance means wearing high-heeled shoes, a hat and gloves. Whereas in fact, wearing sneakers with more sophisticated pants, or mixing day and evening wear, slightly unexpected things — that’s what’s really interesting. But it’s never elegant to be too self-conscious." Inès de la Fressange

womensweardaily:

"There is this idea that elegance means wearing high-heeled shoes, a hat and gloves. Whereas in fact, wearing sneakers with more sophisticated pants, or mixing day and evening wear, slightly unexpected things — that’s what’s really interesting. But it’s never elegant to be too self-conscious." Inès de la Fressange

Via A Style Enthused Young Woman
1 month ago | 81,867 notes

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’
It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions?

- Sandi Toksvig.  (via chubby-bunnies, learninglog) (via my-little-underground) (via snatch-comix)
Via VHS SEX
1 month ago | 663 notes

MRAs reproduce the ideology of slavery with their conception of children as property; consequently, working to reproduce an environment that is conducive to Black marginality and suffering. Thus, MRAs push for the right to an abortion is a significant obstruction to the struggle for gender and racial equity.

-

Marcus Lee wrote an amazing piece about how MRA efforts (like asserting abortion rights for fathers) manage to be both sexist and racist. Lee is a third-year student at Morehouse College and one of participants in RH Reality Check’s Young Writer’s Program.

(The article is great on its own; the enraged MRAs in the comments are just the icing on the cake.)

(Source: thebicker)

Via ASTRIFEROUS
1 month ago | 10,402 notes

Femininity in general is seen as frivolous. People often say feminine people are doing “the most”, meaning that to don a dress, heels, lipstick, and big hair is artifice, fake, and a distraction. But I knew even as a teenager that my femininity was more than just adornments; they were extensions of me, enabling me to express myself and my identity. My body, my clothes, and my makeup are on purpose, just as I am on purpose.

- Janet Mock, Redefining Realness  (via albinwonderland)

(Source: alisonroseishere)

Via Bigger on the Inside
1 month ago | 10,372 notes

Some people think that horror films are some sort of second class filmmaking, and the only way to bypass that thinking is being proud of the fact that we do it. — Clive Barker

Horror is the future. And you cannot be afraid. You must push everything to the absolute limit or else life will be boring. People will be bored. Horror is like a serpent; always shedding its skin, always changing. And it will always come back. It can’t be hidden away like the guilty secrets we try to keep in our subconscious. — Dario Argento

Horror films don’t create fear. They release it. — Wes Craven

I think of horror films as art, as films of confrontations. Films that make you confront aspects of your own life that are difficult to face. Just because you’re making a horror film doesn’t mean you can’t make an artful film. — David Cronenberg

(Source: beatrixkiddos)

Via SMILE BRIGHTER THAN THE FUCKING SUN
1 month ago | 114,746 notes

When I was seventeen and preparing to leave for university, my mother’s only brother saw fit to give me some advice.
“Just don’t be an idiot, kid,” he told me, “and don’t ever forget that boys and girls can never just be friends.”
I laughed and answered, “I’m not too worried. And I don’t really think all guys are like that.”

When I was eighteen and the third annual advent of the common cold was rolling through residence like a pestilent fog, a friend texted me asking if there was anything he could do to help.
I told him that if he could bring me up some vitamin water that would be great, if it wasn’t too much trouble.
That semester I learned that human skin cells replace themselves every three to five weeks. I hoped that in a month, maybe I’d stop feeling the echoes of his touch; maybe my new skin would feel cleaner.
It didn’t. But I stood by what I said. Not all guys are like that.

When I was nineteen and my roommate decided the only way to celebrate the end of midterms was to get wasted at a club, I humoured her.
Four drinks, countless leers and five hands up my skirt later, I informed her I was ready to leave.
“I get why you’re upset,” she told me on the walk home, “but you have to tolerate that sort of thing if you want to have any fun. And really, not all guys are like that.”

(Age nineteen also saw me propositioned for casual sex by no fewer than three different male friends, and while I still believe that guys and girls can indeed be just friends, I was beginning to see my uncle’s point.)

When I was twenty and a stranger that started chatting to me in my usual cafe asked if he could walk with me (since we were going the same way and all), I accepted.
Before we’d even made it three blocks he was pulling me into an alleyway and trying to put his hands up my shirt. “You were staring,” he laughed when I asked what the fuck he was doing (I wasn’t), “I’m just taking pity.”
But not all guys are like that.

I am twenty one and a few days ago a friend and I were walking down the street. A car drove by with the windows down, and a young man stuck his head out and whistled as they passed. I ignored it, carrying on with the conversation.
My friend did not. “Did you know those people?” He asked.
“Not at all,” I answered.
Later when we sat down to eat he got this thoughtful look on his face. When I asked what was wrong he said, “You know not all guys do that kind of thing, right? We’re not all like that.”
As if he were imparting some great profound truth I’d never realized before. My entire life has been turned around, because now I’ve been enlightened: not all guys are like that.

No. Not all guys are. But enough are. Enough that I am uncomfortable when a man sits next to me on the bus. Enough that I will cross to the other side of the street if I see a pack of guys coming my way. Enough that even fleeting eye contact with a male stranger makes my insides crawl with unease. Enough that I cannot feel safe alone in a room with some of my male friends, even ones I’ve known for years. Enough that when I go out past dark for chips or milk or toilet paper, I carry a knife, I wear a coat that obscures my figure, I mimic a man’s gait. Enough that three years later I keep the story of that day to myself, when the only thing that saved me from being raped was a right hook to the jaw and a threat to scream in a crowded dorm, because I know what the response will be.

I live my life with the everburning anxiety that someone is going to put their hands on me regardless of my feelings on the matter, and I’m not going to be able to stop them. I live with the knowledge that statistically one in three women have experienced a sexual assault, but even a number like that can’t be trusted when we are harassed into silence. I live with the learned instinct, the ingrained compulsion to keep my mouth shut to jeers and catcalls, to swallow my anger at lewd suggestions and crude gestures, to put up my walls against insults and threats. I live in an environment that necessitates armouring myself against it just to get through a day peacefully, and I now view that as normal. I have adapted to extreme circumstances and am told to treat it as baseline. I carry this fear close to my heart, rooted into my bones, and I do so to keep myself unharmed.

So you can tell me that not all guys are like that, and you’d even be right, but that isn’t the issue anymore. My problem is not that I’m unaware of the fact that some guys are perfectly civil, decent, kind—my problem is simply this:

In a world where this cynical overcaution is the only thing that ensures my safety, I’m no longer willing to take the risk.

- r.d. 

(Source: elferinge)

Via A L B
1 month ago | 45 notes

It was a beguiling theory that bad arisen in the minds of Wiglet, Waddy, and, yes, even in the not-overly-exercised mind of Fred Colon, and as far as Vimes could understand it, it went like this.
1. Supposing the area behind the barricades was bigger than the area in front of the barricades, right?
2. Like, sort of, it had more people in it and more of the city, if you follow me.
3. Then, correct me if I’m wrong, Sarge, but that’d mean in a manner of speaking we are now in front of the barricades, am I right?
4. Then, as it were, it’s not like we’re rebellin’, is it? ‘Cos there’s more of us, so the majority can’t rebel, it stands to reason.
5. So that makes us the good guys. Obviously we’ve been the good guys all along, but now it’d be kind of official, right? Like, mathematical?
6. So, we thought we’d push on to Short Street and then we could nip into Dimwell and up the other side of the river…
7. Are we going to get into trouble for this, Sarge?
8. You’re looking at me in a funny way, Sarge.
9. Sorry, Sarge.

- Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
Via andraste's knicker weasels
1 month ago | 28,151 notes

Ellen Page said she’d been scared to reveal her truth, and in response way too many people responded with, ”In other news, the sky is blue.” The fact that so many felt comfortable being that rude to someone who’d just publicly shared a private struggle speaks volumes about how important they consider the issues of gay women to be. We should be wary of these people. People like them are why so many believe this country is post-racial or post-feminist when this country is racist as fuck and hates women.

Via LGBT Laughs