Miranda. 23. Filipina-Australian, cisgender, and bisexual lady-type. Useless wastrel who daydreams in sequins, comic book expressions and musical numbers.

You might know me from that one glasses meme.

Prone to posting intersectional feminist quotes, various and varying babes, items of the literary and comic nerd culture and the occasional tentacle.

Any reaction images/gifs I post (unless they are of my face) are almost definitely not mine.

Bisexual person in a relationship with someone of a different sex: I'm not straight, I'm bisexual
Gay community: you're only saying that because you want to be a part of the Gay Club, you don't belong with us, you're basically just a straight person anyway
Bisexual person in a relationship with someone of the same sex: I'm not gay I'm bisexual
Gay community: why do you feel the need to clarify that? You just want to be one of the straight people, you just want to reassure them that you're Not That Gay, you don't belong with us

cisphobicshibe:

Things you shouldn’t use to describe trans people because they other us or make us sound like we aren’t people and are really rude and offensive:

  • "the trans"
  • "a trans"
  • "transes"
  • "transgenders"
  • "transgendereds"
  • "not-cis"
  • "abnormal"

Things you should call trans people:

  • trans people
  • people who are trans
  • the trans community
  • transgender people
  • supreme overlords

(Source: )

rauchbros:

Here it is, a brand new StoryCorps short in honor of Pride Month!

TRANS LIFE SIMULATOR || s3.amazonaws.com

the-goddamazon:

annabunches:

childhoodreclaimed:

nerdy-trans-girl:

dont-be-stupid-friend:

This is a simple text based game where you play as a young trans person trying to buy some underwear. I made it with the intention of showing cis people what it’s like to be trans. You can play as a trans girl, trans boy, or a nonbinary person. It’s short, so you can play it multiple times for different paths. There are several paths, some better, some worse; if you’re easily triggered by dysphoria or transphobia, you may want to avoid this game. Some paths are safer than others, depending on how well you pass (surprise, surprise). TW for homophobic/transphobic slurs, transphobia/transmisogyny, slurs, misgendering, and possible violence.

I did this just to see how relatable it was, and holy shit it was like someone put me back in the spots i was in only a year ago.  My heart is racing shit. 

ow… my everything hurts…

Hey all my cis followers: this is instructive. Go play it.

This frustrated me to no end. It’s no where near as bad as actually living it, but I finally have a semblance of understanding the frustration. Christ.

horaceknightely:

kefkaownsall:

Hey its a show about trans women played by a trans woman 

As well as a Kickstarter fund to get this on television, with broadcasting in both Canada and possibly the United States! It’s also produced by a queer trans independent filmmaker, Amy Fox, and has only 52 days left to raise $50,000 CAD.

Those who can support through reblogs and/or donations, please go ahead! The link above is a clickthrough straight to the Kickstarter. Backers get cool prizes like copies of the screenplay, 8 x 11” prints of the lead actress Julie Vu from her photo shoots, download links the the ENTIRE first season, and more.

They’ve got 39 days and and about 33K to go! Let’s do it!

bisexual-pirate-ladies-ac:

I’m here! I’m queer! And I’m kinda disappointed with mainstream LGBT groups for their dismissal, erasure and misrepresentation of parts of their community!

fatbisexualpenguin:

People who say bi erasure doesn’t happen need to realize Freddie Mercury is known as the most famous homosexual man when he identified himself as bisexual. If that’s not bi erasure I don’t even know.

[Spiderman] represents the everyman, but he represents the underdog and those marginalized who come up against great prejudice which I, as a middle-class straight, white man, don’t really understand so much. And when Stan Lee first wrote and created this character, the outcast was the computer nerd, was the science nerd, was the guy that couldn’t get the girl. Those guys now run the world. So how much of an outcast is that version of Peter Parker anymore? That’s my question.

-

Part of Andrew Garfield’s response to people being all butthurt when he mentioned a possibility where Spiderman might not be straight.

Read More: On Andrew Garfield, Stan Lee, And A Bisexual Spider-Man

(via 500daysofsumeria)

(Source: acelessthan3)

Guest Post: Batwoman: Three Authors; Three Kinds of Queer Experience

dcwomenkickingass:

Last week I made a comment about being by what the the current Batwoman writer Marc Andreyko said in an interview about DADT as part of Kate’s story. Andreyko later stopped by the blog to clarify things. I also received some input on my comment from a reader of the blog, Moira Phippen, which turned into a short discussion on where Batwoman was a character and her thoughts on Andreyko as a writer. I was so taken with her insights that I asked her to expand on them in a guest post. Here she discusses the three different authors that Kate Kane has had and their differing approaches to the character’s queer identity. Her thoughts follow and I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

I found Kate Kane just around the time of my life that I was beginning to come out, to my friends, family, community, partners, and even to myself. As a character, she is so crucial to me. Seeing a queer-identifying character take on the “Bat” name, and not just a girl, but as a “woman,” self-assured, confident, aware of herself and who she was… I can’t express how much an image like her was meaningful to me as a young adult coming to terms with a conclusion about her sexuality that she had tried her very best to avoid. No matter the writer, Kate has always embraced who she is, no apologies offered. Rucka, Williams, and now Andreyko have become some of my most treasured authors due to the care each have taken with Kate.

As I have grown older, I’ve embarked on my own path to being more like Kate: I try to be brave like her, bold like her, uncompromising like her. My relationship with each writer’s Kate - because they are, all of them, different Kates - has developed with me. In a way, they each represent different kinds of interpretations and portrayals of the queer experience and identity, all of which hold some unique and different value or impact. 

image

Read More

Perhaps I need to pick up the current Batwoman run then.

gaywrites:

Ten years after the debut of the life-altering movie that is Mean Girls, actor Daniel Franzese, who played openly gay high schooler Damian, has come out as gay.

Franzese, now 36, wrote a letter to his character that was published in IndieWire. He asks himself why it had taken him so long to come out as gay, saying that his portrayal of Damian actually set him back in Hollywood and in his own personal coming to terms with himself.

The whole thing is damn insightful and meaningful, but here’s a particularly telling excerpt about how Daniel’s career took an unexpected turn after he played Damian:

One time I wanted to audition for a supporting character in a low-budget indie movie described as a “doughy, blue-collar lug of a guy.”  The role was to play the husband of an actress friend of mine who I had been in two movies and an Off-Broadway play with.  She and I had even moved to L.A. together. I figured I was perfect for it.

They said they were looking for a real “man’s man.”  The casting director wouldn’t even let me audition. This wasn’t the last time this happened. There were industry people who had seen me play you in Mean Girls but never seen me read in an audition but still denied me to be seen for “masculine” roles.

However, I did turn down many offers to play flamboyant, feather-boa-slinging stereotypes that always seemed to be laughed at BECAUSE they were gay. How could I go from playing an inspirational, progressive gay youth to the embarrassing, cliched butt-of-a-joke? 

So, there it was. Damian, you had ruined my life and I was really pissed at you. I became celibate for a year and a half. I didn’t go to any gay bars, have any flings and I lied to anyone who asked if I was gay. I even brought a girl to the ‘Mean Girls’ premiere and kissed her on the red carpet, making her my unwitting beard.  

Why come out now, then? 

It wasn’t until years later that grown men started to coming up to me on the street - some of them in tears - and thanking me for being a role model to them. Telling me I gave them comfort not only being young and gay but also being a big dude. It was then that I realized how much of an impact YOU had made on them.  

Before you make the “too gay to function” joke, which I totally did before I finished reading the article, listen to what he has to say about it:

I hate it when people say I’m ‘too gay to function.’ I know you do, too. Those people are part of the problem. They should refrain from using that phrase. It really is only OK when Janis says it.

It takes some serious guts to be this open about the intermingling of your career and your personal life, especially when admitting that playing a beloved character in a classic movie has impacted you in a negative way. I have loads of respect for this man. Congrats, Daniel.